June 3, 2011

It's been a while......


It’s been a while since I’ve posted a case study, so I apologize to anyone who checks out the site regularly. I have been incredibly wrapped up with home life, clinic, and a relatively large translation job that has left little time nor desire to translate anything else. Now that the job is done, I can refocus on translating pieces I actually want to and enjoy.

Last month in Portland at the Zeng Rong-Xiu conference I was chatting with a couple colleagues who write blogs as well about how lonely the blogging world is. It’s hard to know if anyone ever reads these blogs (as comments are few and far between) let alone what they actually think. So if folks don’t mind, I’d love it if you would leave a comment just to say hi, let me know I’m not alone within this blog, and leave any constructive criticism you may have no matter how ego shattering it may be. Don’t worry, I can take it.

Thanks for reading.

9 comments:

Ellen said...

I just discovered you through a link from Sharon Weizenbaum. I'm getting into Classical Theory and from what I've read of the case studies so far they were great!
thanks
Ellen Teeter, AP

Three said...

Hi Eran,

I am relieved to hear and grateful that you mention the isolating exercise of blog posting. I just happened on your blog again today and am happy to see a new case study. Please keep it up.

Best,
Renee
www.threepartswisdom.com

Eran Even said...

@Ellen, Thanks for checking out the blog, it is very much appreciated.

@Three, yes blogging can be a lonely experience, and it's nice to know that others share my sentiment. Cool website BTW!!

sharon weizenbaum said...

Hi Eran,

Welcome back. I'm there, waiting and reading. I think you do a great job of choosing relevant case studies from interesting doctors. I look forward to what's to come....

Eran Even said...

Thanks for the kind words Sharon, I really do appreciate it, and the feelings' mutual!

Karla Renaud said...

Hi Eran, translating Chinese medicine is definitely a lonely thankless "job" even when done for the love of the medicine! It's hard on the brain and the eyes, which is why I've avoided doing polished written translations since I switched from academia to practicing chinese medicine over a decade ago (just reading stuff in Chinese for my own info is so much easier and not the same). So I truly appreciate and really enjoy your cases.

Someday I'll get back to translating, so I'm curious, if you're just doing your own translation for free public view on your case blog (not publishing a book for sale), do you need publisher permission from the Chinese author and/or publisher? I'm not clear on the whole internet copyright publishing stuff, and would like to know before I start anything. Thanks! Karla (although hmm, maybe Canada and US differ?)

Eran Even said...

Hi Karla,
You're absolutely right, translating does often feel like a thankless job, and although I do it for the love of the medicine and the language, it is still nice to hear some positive words of encouragement, so thank you!!

You know I have never actually thought of the whole publishing rights thingy until now. I have not received permission from the authors nor the publishers to put up these cases, but it is my limited understanding that as long as I am not selling anything, it shouldn't be much of a problem. Now if I were ever to get these cases published properly, I would most certainly try to attain the rights. Hope I'm not threading on deep water here :|
I don't think (again a total assumption on my part) that there would be any difference between Canada and the US in regards to internet publishing.

If you ever feel like like translating an interesting case I would be more than happy to post it here. Might be a good way to get your feet wet again. Let me know.

Thanks again,

Eran

Z'ev Rosenberg said...

I love your work, Eran, and it was great meeting you in Portland. I'd love to contribute, but unfortunately I already wear two hats, i.e. CM physician and professor at PCOM San Diego. I dream of being able to spend much of my day translating and studying Chinese medical texts, but unfortunately I have to support a family and put two kids through college. So I'll continue to enjoy the great work folks like you, Sharon, Michael Max, Lorraine Wilcox, Sabine Wilms and so many others contribute. .

Eran Even said...

Thanks for the kind words Z'ev.

It was an absolute pleasure meeting and spending time with you in Portland as well.
I too share in your dream of being able to spend my days reading and translating ancient medical texts, but with a family to feed and support this is obviously not a reality. we do what we can :)
If you ever do want to send me something to post, I would be more than honored to put it up.
Talk soon.
Eran

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